C2C Student Design Competition

Use your skill and creativity to design winning prints and products.

About

OverviewEducational ComponentPublication ResourcesAATCC Standards

This year’s theme asks students to design a sustainable travel wear line that incorporates recycled materials, sustainable manufacturing, and antibacterial and/or odor-control properties.

All items must be textile-based.

Competition Requirements

  • Individual/Student Membership (required)
  • Membership applications take up to one business day to process
  • Undergraduate or graduate students. Individuals ONLY! (US and international.)
  •  Only one entry per student per AATCC competition per year is permitted.
  • All portions of the entry must be received on or before 11am EST April 5, 2022.

Competition Guidelines

Educational Component:

Coming soon! 

AATCC will provide online resources regarding AATCC Test Methods related to the theme. Each entry must address the questions as noted in the guidelines. Look at the tabs to the right.

Coming Soon! 

AATCC Standards

  • AATCC began developing test methods in 1921
  • AATCC has developed more than 200 standards including test methods and evaluation procedures
  • All current AATCC standards are published in the annual AATCC Technical Manual
  • See a list of all AATCC standards: Testing Methods

Why are AATCC Test Methods Important?

  • Purchase contracts specify in detail how goods are to be tested
  • In both domestic and international markets, acceptance and rejection of textiles are based on meeting performance standards
  • Product specification should be considered as early as the design phase
  • See video for further details:

What do AATCC Test Methods Provide?

  • Numerical results based on measurements or visual scales
  • Common language for comparing or approving textiles
    • AATCC does not establish pass/fail criteria, but interested parties can determine their own criteria knowing that everyone is using the same scale

How are AATCC Test Methods Developed?

  • AATCC Test Methods are developed by volunteers in all industry segments
  • See video for further details:
  • Membership Deadline

    April 1, 2022
  • Entries Deadline

    11am US EST April 5, 2022

Contact

Concept 2 Consumer® Design Winners

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AATCC is happy to announce the winners of the 2021 AATCC Concept 2 Consumers® Student Design Competition!

AATCC received 41 entries, with 57 students participating from 20 colleges and universities.

This year’s theme, Fashion Evolution, showcased AATCC’s Centennial—the Association’s 100th Birthday! The theme for AATCC’s Centennial celebrations is “Celebrating a Century—Focused on the Future!”

Fashion Evolution mirrored that theme. From the 1920s, when AATCC was founded, to the present day, students were asked to choose a decade from the last 100 years and reinvent the fashions for the 2020 decade, focusing on one or more of the following:

  • fit/sizing for various body types
  • sustainable fashion
  • personal protection
  • new textile materials/technology

First Place

Movement by Doran Kim, University of Texas, Austin

This student was awarded:

  • US$1,000 from AATCC
  • PantoneCotton Passport and COY mug
  • US$300 SpoonflowerGift Certificate and Spoonflower DIY Book Bundle
  • US$200 Jacquard Inkjet FabricSystems gift certificate to obtain prepared for dyeing (PFD) fabric
  • DatacolorColorReaderPRO
  • One-year free AATCC Student Membership

Kim is a Textiles and Apparel Major & Entrepreneurship Minor at the University of Texas, Austin.

She says, “From this competition, I learned how fashion trends evolve and return to popularity. It was an educational moment for me as a designer to create a collection that brings nostalgia from past fashion trends in a way that the current market desires.

I have seen many fashion brands that only focus on one part of the sustainable production process. In the future, I want to create clothing that is truly sustainable in every step from sourcing to the after-use stage. I want to prove with my designs that we do not have to exploit natural resources, abuse animals, or neglect human rights just to look good. Contributing to better fashion practice is the future I dream.”

Second Place

Caminates by Carla Pierini, Drexel University

This student was awarded:

  • US$750 from AATCC
  • PantoneCotton Passport and COY mug
  • US$150 SpoonflowerGift Certificate and Spoonflower DIY Book Bundle
  • US$100 Jacquard InkjetFabric Systems gift certificate to obtain prepared for dyeing (PFD) fabric
  • DatacolorColorReaderPRO
  • One-year free AATCC Student Membership

Pierini is a sophomore majoring in Fashion Design at Drexel University.

She says, “From this competition I learned that no matter how abstract ideas can look, you can achieve the unimaginable with dedication, passion, and people that support and believe in your potential. For my future, I want to focus on finding the perfect balance in my career, working on sustainable, innovative, and impactful projects that will bring a positive change in the fashion industry and society.”

Third Place

Moonchild by Ingrid Yeung, University of California, Davis

This student was awarded:

  • US$200 from AATCC
  • US$75 SpoonflowerGift Certificate and Spoonflower DIY Book Bundle
  • US$50 JacquardInkjet Fabric Systems gift certificate to obtain prepared for dyeing (PFD) fabric
  • Datacolor
  • One-year free AATCC Student Membership

Yeung is a Junior pursuing a BA in Design and BS in Managerial Economics.

She says, “Throughout this process, I learned the complexities of functional apparel design, and I was able to challenge myself to discover new forms of innovation and creativity within fashion. In the future, I aim to design within a space that merges functionality and aesthetic/beauty while also producing work with impact that can outlast the prevailing life cycle of rapid consumption.”

Developers, Judges, and Sponsors

AATCC would like to extend appreciation to the following developers, judges, and sponsors. Without their expertise and assistance, the competition would not have been possible.

Developers

  • Sandra Johnson, Senior Account Manager at Color Solutions International
  • Nora Khanna, Product Development Manager at Pantone
  • Kerry King, Vice President, R&D at Spoonflower Inc.
  • Muditha Senanayake, Professor at Cal Poly Pomona
  • Alyssa McNamara, Project Manager at Spoonflower Inc.

Judges

  • Lisa Beck, Product Manager at Datacolor
  • Emily Coleman, Designer and Merchandise Manager at Jefferies Socks
  • Hunter Ellis, President at Jacquard Inkjet Fabric Systems
  • Yvonne Johnson, Senior Director: Product Development at Cotton Incorporated
  • Lauren Koury, E-commerce Specialist at Carolina Hosiery Mills
  • Alyssa McNamara, Project Manager at Spoonflower Inc.
  • Kristie Rhodes, Manager, Product Development at Cotton Incorporated
  • Carrie Yates, Associate Director, Knit Product Development at Cotton Incorporated

Sponsors:

About AATCC: AATCC is the world’s leading not-for-profit association serving textile professionals since 1921. AATCC, headquartered in Research Triangle Park, NC, USA, provides test method development, quality control materials, and professional networking for members throughout the world.

 Media Contact:

 Manisha Patel | Corporate & Student Membership Specialist

AATCC

1 Davis Drive | PO Box 12215 | Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2115 | USA

Office: +1.919.549.549.3523 | Fax: +1.919.549.8933 | Headquarters: +1.919.549.8141

Email: patelm@aatcc.org | www.aatcc.org

AATCC is happy to announce the winners of the 2020 AATCC Concept 2 Consumers® Student Design Competition!

AATCC received 29 entries, with 43 students participating from 16 colleges and universities. This year’s “Everlasting Style”-themed competition challenged students to design an apparel line (3-5 designs) for office/work attire that was timeless in terms of sustainability, quality, and style. Again this year, students were asked to access educational resources, so they could highlight at least one AATCC test method and why it was important to their product line. See the full guidelines for the contest online.

First Place

Nouvelle Femme by Lauren Bouvier, University of Arkansas

This student was awarded:

Lauren Bouvier is a senior majoring in apparel merchandising & product development from the University of Arkansas. Bouvier says, “This competition was an opportunity to apply what I have learned in the classroom to a real-world scenario. It challenged me to create clothing designs that serve and empower young professional women in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. In the future I hope to work in fashion merchandising then pursue higher education and teach at the university level. I have had so many inspiring teachers and I hope to empower the next generation in the same way. This competition has shown me the importance of identifying an area of need when developing something new then finding a solution for that need. I hope to continue to solve problems and serve people in my future work.”

Second Place

WEco by Izzy Volpe, Drexel University

This student was awarded:

Izzy Volpe is a sophomore in fashion design at Drexel University, who plans to graduate in 2022.

Volpe says, “From this competition, I learned that there are many complex steps apparel designers must take in order to make their garments functional for realistic purposes. There is a lot of trial and error, and much testing goes into every piece of clothing that we wear. This was able to make me realize that I should design with ‘life’ in mind as time moves forward….if my pieces are to have a greater longevity, I must pay attention to the scientific side to the artistic process.”

Volpe hopes to design for a creative brand that focuses on making highly captivating garments while maintaining ecologically friendly philosophies. “Success for me will mean that I am able to freely design imaginative pieces that are functional and comfortable for people who want to express themselves through art, freely. This competition was able to widen my knowledge on how timeless designs are achieved, as well as how green design is possible in the testing phase of creation.”

Honorable Mentions (2)

These students were awarded (group winners split the prize package):

Belle Fleur by Annabelle McLeod, Auburn University

Annabelle McLeod is a junior majoring in apparel design and production management at Auburn University. Mcleod says, “This competition challenged me to think about the importance of sustainability in fashion. I learned that one of the most important aspects to sustainable fashion is the longevity of the garment, which means appropriate design, test methods, and textiles must be selected in order to create something that will stand the test of time.”

McLeod hopes her future career will be designing for a high-end fashion brand in a big city, such as New York. McLeod states, “One of the biggest things I learned from this competition is perseverance. I doubted myself many times throughout the process of creating this line and spent a lot of time going back to the drawing board. Halfway through starting this project, a global pandemic took over the world and my normal school and work environment was flipped upside down. This competition provided a means of distraction and focus during a time of unknown, which I am extremely thankful for. Overall this competition taught me a lot about myself as a designer and allowed me to focus on my technique, as well as giving me a better understanding of the science that goes into creating a garment. I hope to take these lessons learned into my future career and strive to continue improving and expanding my design knowledge for years to come.”

Urban Nest by senior group Francesca Burks, Michelle Cruz, Xiaoyi (Nicole) Liu, and Jessica DeGard; California State Polytechnic University, Pomona

Michelle Cruz is a senior majoring in apparel merchandising and management at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona.

Francesca Burks is a senior, majoring in apparel merchandising and management, with a textiles emphasis at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona. Burks says, “I learned how to effectively lead and manage a group project by ensuring we all met weekly deadlines and split up the work according to our strengths. I also learned more about AATCC test methods and how to select which test methods are important depending on the garment and its intended end use.”

Burks is planning her future career to be in textile research and development, testing, or material development geared towards sportswear. “The effective teamwork strategies and the knowledge I obtained about AATCC test methods from this competition will help me in my desired career area. Being able to work well in teams is always important in any career and developing a deeper understanding of product development and test methods will prepare me to work in research and development, testing, or material development.”

 

Xiaoyi (Nicole) Liu is a senior majoring in apparel merchandising management, with a retailing option at California State Polytechnic University, Pomona. Liu reflects, “This is the first time I did a project virtually, and this is a new comprehensive skill set for future in school and work.”

“I am about to graduate and am planning to work in fashion retail-related industry such as fashion buyer. I have learned about researching fashion trends and have a deeper understanding of the ongoing fashion world.  Even though we are all isolated at home because of the epidemic, we are also making fashion style adjustment to this new world. We designed a coat with mask to give extra protection to the wearer. The idea is to combine functional elements under current epidemic situation while we are still able to maintain the aesthetic aspect of fashion design. I think the most important thing that I learned from this competition is that fashion is always constantly changing around the world whether it is a new situation like this or environmental changes that lead us to choose different materials and design.”

 

Jessica DeGard is a senior majoring in apparel merchandising and management, with a retailing emphasis. DeGard shares, “This competition taught me the importance of attention to detail and how to work closely in a group effort. I aspire to become a merchandiser for Patagonia. This competition applies to my future career goals, because it required teamwork and research about cost, fabrication, and market trends.”

AATCC would like to extend appreciation to the following developers, judges, and sponsors. Without their expertise and assistance, the competition would not have been possible.

Developers:

Sandra Johnson, Senior Account Manager at Color Solutions International
Nora Khanna, Product Development Manager at Pantone
Kerry King, Vice President, R&D at Spoonflower Inc.
Muditha Senanayake, Interim Dept. Chair, Associate Professor, Apparel Merchandising and Management at Cal Poly Pomona
Alyssa McNamara, Research Associate at Spoonflower Inc.

Judges:

Lisa Beck, Product Manager at Datacolor
Emily Coleman, Designer and Merchandise Manager at Jefferies Socks
Hunter Ellis, President at Jacquard Inkject Fabric Systems
Anna Hall, E-commerce Specialist at Jefferies Socks
Ken Hamby, General Manager at Jefferies Socks
Yvonne Johnson, Director: Product Development at Cotton Incorporated
Lauren Koury, E-commerce Specialist at Carolina Hosiery Mills
Alyssa McNamara, Research Associate at Spoonflower Inc.
Kristie Rhodes, Manager, Product Development at Cotton Incorporated
Mike Scrutton, Director, Print Technology and Strategy at Adobe
Brennan West, Design Associate / Wrangler Modern Men’s Global at Kontoor Brands, Inc.
Seth Winner, Technical Manager for Wovens at Cotton Incorporated
Carrie Yates, Manager of Product Development at Cotton Incorporated

Sponsors:

Datacolor

       

Winners Announcement
2018 AATCC Concept 2 Consumer® Student Design Competition

AATCC is happy to announce the winners of the 2018 AATCC Concept 2 Consumers® Student Design Competition!

AATCC received 93 entries, with 108 students participating from 23 colleges and universities. This year’s theme, All Day Adventures in Activewear, challenged students to design a line for a specific outdoor or indoor athletic activity (cycling, running, group fitness, hiking, etc.) that must be able to transition to everyday wear. This new line should enhance the athletic enthusiast’s experience while also transitioning to everyday wear. See the full competition guidelines for more details.

The Winners:

1st Place: Tidal Trash by Cecily Ripley, University of Wisconsin Stout, was awarded US$1,000 from AATCC; a Macbook Pro with a one year VStitcher software license and a paid internship from Browzwear; a Pantone Cotton Passport; a US$100 Spoonflower Gift Certificate; a Datacolor Spyder5; and one year of CLO 3D fashion design software.

See Cecily’s entry here

Cecily Ripley is a Junior majoring in Apparel Design and Development. Ripley says,”One thing I learned from this competition is the importance of research and understanding your target market and their needs. Prior to designing, I spent countless hours researching the athletic activity I chose, surfing, and discovered that the number of young, female surfers is growing. I decided to tailor my target market to accommodate this shift in the sport. Next, I researched fashion, specifically swimwear, and cultural trends. As a Sustainable Design Minor and with the growing trend of environmental consciousness, I knew I wanted to incorporate sustainability into my designs. Due to the functional needs of swimwear, I was not able to incorporate the typical sustainable fabrics. Instead I decided to encompass a sustainable message into my designs through the prints and surface design. This competition challenged me think critically about the needs of my target market and incorporate a transitional design feature. By spending the time researching, I was able to pinpoint the functional and aesthetic needs of a surfer and design a line that meets these needs while being transitional from surf to sand.”

Ripley is interested in becoming a successful creative or technical designer in apparel and being on the forefront of establishing sustainable practices in the apparel industry. “As an apparel designer, I feel that I have a great responsibility to create quality products in an ethical way,” she says. “I liked this year’s competition challenge of creating transitional garments because it challenges designers to create quality designs with sustainability and consumer needs in mind. It also encourages consumers to wear the same garment in many different occasions. This competition will help me as a future designer in industry to understand the functional needs of any target market, allowing me to create practical garments that consumers will want and hopefully wear for the garment’s full life, reducing waste.”

2nd Place: Siren Scuba by Sarah West, University of Arkansas, was awarded US$750 from AATCC; a one year VStitcher software license and a paid internship from Browzwear; a Pantone Cotton Passport; a US$100 Spoonflower Gift Certificate; a Datacolor Spyder5; and 6 months of CLO 3D fashion design software.

West is a first year Masters student majoring in Apparel Merchandising and Product Development. West says, “I learned new software, improved my current skills, and developed my ability to integrate several skills into a finished product by participating in this competition. My previous training includes trend forecasting, design, and Adobe Creative Cloud, and I’m stronger now in all of these. I learned how to use CLO3D for this project, which became essential to the aesthetic quality of my submission. The integration of Illustrator sketches, CLO3D pattern drafting, 3D draping, and avatar animation, and organizing these visual elements in InDesign was a unique challenge that brought my skill set to a higher level.”

West intends to work in the apparel industry for a time, then return to school for a doctoral degree to become an educator. “My experience with this competition will be invaluable,” she says. “When I enter the industry, I will stand out because of my experience with 3D apparel design. The challenges I met and the knowledge I gained in this competition, like designing for a theme and practicing diversity and inclusion, prepared me for when I continue my education and begin teaching.”

Honorable Mention: Hiking with Melody by Yiling Lai, Drexel University, was awarded US$100 from AATCC; a one year VStitcher software license from Browzwear; a US$50 Spoonflower Gift Certificate; a Datacolor Spyder5; and 3 months of CLO 3D fashion design software.

Lai is a graduate student getting a Master of Science in Fashion Design. Lai says. “I learned how to balance practicality and creativity while designing garments and surface design. I want to work in the eco-friendly fashion field. Learning how to design garments to not only look good, but also to be used a lot is the first step which helps me to achieve my goal. I also had a chance to do research on environmental protection fabric, and tried to incorporate them into my design. This process was very helpful as well.”

Honorable Mention: Stuff Stashers by Holly Conner, Central Michigan University, was awarded US$100 from AATCC; a one year VStitcher software license from Browzwear; a US$50 Spoonflower Gift Certificate; a Datacolor Spyder5; and 3 months of CLO 3D fashion design software.

Conner graduated this year with a dual major in Fashion Design and Fashion Merchandising. Conner says, “From this competition, I learned to think creatively about the cohesion of design aesthetic and functionality. I especially learned that specialized functions in apparel are highly valuable and innovative. I will be attending Central Michigan University to attain my Master’s Degree in Apparel Product Development and Merchandising Technology. After that, I plan to enter the design industry, and my end goal is to get my doctorate and return to a university setting as a fashion professor. This competition helped me to exercise my creativity, which will absolutely be applicable to any creative job I acquire.”

AATCC would like to extend appreciation to the following developers, judges, and sponsors. Without their expertise and assistance, the competition would not have been possible.

Developers:

Mary Brannon, Apparel Technology Coordinator at Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising 
Sandra Johnson, Senior Account Manager at Color Solutions International
Nora Khanna, Product Development Manager at Pantone
Kerry King, Vice President, R&D at Spoonflower Inc.
Muditha Senanayake, Interim Dept. Chair, Associate Professor, Apparel Merchandising and Management at Cal Poly Pomona
Mark Sunderland, Director Academic Operations/Textile Engineer + Strategist at Thomas Jefferson University

Judges:

Craig Crawford, King of Creative at CrawfordIT
Bunny Donahue, Creative Director at Becket Dress
Sara Englehart, Product and Procurement Manager at Spoonflower Inc.
Meredith Feingold, Social Media and Content Coordinator at Spoonflower Inc.
Jasmin Ghaffarian, Senior Director of Global Product & Urban Exploration at The North Face
Lena Lim, Chief Commercial Officer at Browzwear
Alyssa McNamara, Research Associate at Spoonflower, Inc.
Kristie Rhodes, Manager, Product Development at Cotton Incorporated
Ryan Teng, VP of Business Development at CLO Virtual Fashion
Carrie Yates, Manager of Product Development at Cotton Incorporated
Paula Zanger, Creative Director /Product Designer at Orange Howell

Sponsors:

C2C Student Design Competition Results

AATCC is happy to announce the winners of the 2017 AATCC Concept 2 Consumer® Student Design Competition.

AATCC received 45 entries, with 46 students participating from 14 various colleges and universities. This year’s theme, Everyday Clothes for Extraordinary Kids, challenged students to design a line that redesigns apparel items (leggings, t-shirts, etc.) for children with special needs and/or a disability. The new line was to enhance the everyday existence of these children and/or their parents/caregivers. The color palette could be chosen from the Pantoneview Colour Planner Summer 2016.

Awards and Winners:

1st place: Little Voyager by Sarah Steger, University of Wisconsin-Stout.

Steger will be graduating in May of 2018 with a BS in Apparel Design and Development and a minor in Business Administration. “This project helped develop my skills in Illustrator and became the kickoff point for my love of designing and rendering in CAD,” says Steger. “I knew immediately that I wanted to design for visually impaired children and create a fun, interactive collection that fulfilled functionality with braille graphics while also allowing each child to show off their bright, unique personality. One difficult aspect of this competition was my attempt to create clothing that was more gender fluid, but by letting my inspiration of a child’s adventuring spirit, I designed with a little voyager in mind.”

The Runway of Dreams Foundation sponsored a US$5,000 scholarship for this first-place winner. Steger will be presented with the award at the Runway of Dreams Foundation Gala and Fashion Show in New York City, NY, USA on June 8, 2017. The Runway of Dreams Foundation prize included travel and overnight hotel accommodations for Steger. In addition, Steger was awarded prizes of US$1,000 from AATCC, a Pantone Cotton Passport, a US$100 Spoonflower Gift Certificate, US$100 with an award plaque from Shrimag Creations, and a Datacolor Spyder5.

2nd place: Jungle Jr. by Madeline Bratager, University of Wisconsin-Stout.

Bratager is a Junior pursuing a Bachelor’s degree in Apparel Design & Development with a minor in sustainability. “After graduation, I hope to design for a sustainable company and work toward creating a more sustainable fashion industry. This project was a lot about creative problem solving and finding multiple solutions and I think that will definitely help me in the future as I pursue a career in design and sustainable design,” says Bratager. “I learned a lot about functional garments and catering to a specific market’s needs. Adding functional adaptive aspects to trending clothing without changing the overall aesthetic was a fun puzzle to piece together. This project has pushed me to expand my creativity of functionality in design and understand how important functional garments are.”

Bratager won US$750 from AATCC, a Pantone Cotton Passport, a US$100 Spoonflower Gift Certificate, US$100 with an award plaque from Shrimag Creations, and a Datacolor Spyder5.

Honorable Mention (2 prizes): For the Kids by Melissa Cancel, Florida State University, and Fruity Paradise by Morgan Young, University of Delaware.

“From participating in this competition, I learned how to research products, create innovative ideas, and combine it into a presentable project,” says Cancel. After graduation, Cancel hopes to work at the headquarters of a brand with a strong online presence working in product development or merchandising. Cancel says, “Learning about how to re-design previous products with a modern twist, like what was done in this competition, will be very beneficial in this [planned] career.”

Young is a junior at the University of Delaware majoring in Apparel Design with a minor in Spanish. “Being a participant in the competition, I learned a lot about the many issues faced by children with disabilities. It is not often that people think about these issues, but being able to problem solve and potentially make a difference in someone’s life was my motivation in this competition,” says Young.

Young’s plans include continuing a company that she recently co-founded called AndAgain. “We focus on up-cycling denim and combating the issues of sustainability within the fashion world,” Young says. “Working through issues that children face in their everyday lives pushed my creativity levels and I know this will help me in my future by giving me the motivation to keep pursuing more innovative ideas.”

Young and Cancel each won US$100 from AATCC, a US$50 Spoonflower Gift Certificate, US$25 with award plaque from Shrimag Creations, and a Datacolor Spyder5.

Melissa Cancel                                                        Morgan Young

AATCC thanks the following developers, judges, and sponsors. Without their donations, expertise and assistance, the competition would not have been possible.

Developers:

Brooks Tippett, VP of Operations at Pantone

Heidi Carvalho, Product Engineer at Brahmin Leather Works

Kerry King, Vice President, R&D at Spoonflower Inc.

Mary Brannon, Apparel Technology Coordinator at Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising

Nora Khanna, Product Development Manager at Pantone

Judges:

Carrie Yates, Manager of Product Development at Cotton Incorporated

Ken Hamby, General Manager at Jefferies Socks

Meg Yahashi, Operations Analyst at Care+Wear

Meredith Feingold, Social Media Manager at Spoonflower Inc.

Mindy Scheier, Founder and CEO, Runway of Dreams

Sara Engelhard, Senior Product Development Associate at Spoonflower Inc.

Tina Beauvais, President at EmBraced In Comfort

Vanessa Sanchez, Summer Program Mentor at Open Style Lab and Research Fellow at Harvard University

Sponsors:

Concept 2 Consumer® Design Winners 2016

AATCC is happy to announce the winners of the 2016 AATCC Concept 2 Consumer® Student Design Competition!

AATCC received 56 entries, with 76 students participating from 14 colleges and universities. This year’s theme, Metamorphosis, challenged students to create a garment that transformed. Examples of transformations included changing color, serving multiple purposes, or changing through the actual design of the fabric. Color palettes were chosen from the Pantoneview Color Planner Summer 2016.

Awards included a first place cash award of US$1,000 along with a copy of Pantone’s Cotton Passport,  US$100 Spoonflower gift certificate, and Datacolor Spyder 5; a US$750 award for second place, along with a copy of Pantone’s Cotton Passport, US$100 Spoonflower gift certificate, and Datacolor Spyder 5; and two US$100 awards for honorable mentions along with a US$50 Spoonflower gift certificate, and Datacolor Spyder 5.

The Winners:

First Place—Traveling Cloud by Darya Karenskaya, University of Massachusetts-Dartmouth. Karenskaya has a Master’s degree in Linguistics and a Bachelor’s in Education, and is currently switching careers by working on a certificate in textile design. “Winning the competition means a lot to me,” she says. “I think it shows that I am moving in the right direction.” She notes that it was not easy, since she is not a fashion design student. “My focus is primarily on designing patterns rather than constructing garments,” she says. “The competition required me to work in a much broader direction. I enjoyed the challenge and put a lot of love into the three prints incorporated in my design.”

Second Place—Unveil by Emily Kopcik, an apparel design major at the University of Delaware. Kopcik says, “The Metamorphosis design competition challenged me to learn design techniques that previously, I had not considered, such as detachable garments and changing fabrics. At first, it was difficult to come up with a design that would be functional for the consumer as well as aesthetically pleasing. Pushing the limits and creating innovative, sustainable designs that have more than one function is a concept that I think will continue to become more popular in the fashion industry. This contest led me to create further designs with a metamorphosis aspect and it will definitely help me in future endeavors.”

Honorable Mention—Sweet Summer Days by Anne Cops, University of Wisconsin-Stout. Cops is majoring in apparel design and development, and hopes to graduate in May 2017. After graduation, she plans to join a company in a technical design position, but hopes to work on her fashion design and textile design skills and eventually pursue a career in that direction. “It was challenging to think of an idea for this competition,” she notes. “When I came up with the idea, I needed to research how inflatable life vests work and that impacted my original design. My final design kept the inflatable shape very similar to an inflatable life vest.

Honorable MentionRain Daze by Cory Schneiders, Drexel University. Schneiders is currently a sophomore, majoring in fashion design. “By participating in this competition, I learned so much of the process behind textile design,” he says. “I enjoyed the challenges I came across within the competition, and I was really excited about having complete creative freedom.” In addition, he notes, “I believe that I will continue to utilize the knowledge and skills I have acquired from this competition throughout my career, and I greatly appreciate the opportunities this competition has granted me!”

AATCC would like to extend grateful appreciation to the following developers, judges, and sponsors. Without their expertise and assistance, the Competition would not have been possible. Special thanks to Karen Kyllo, Deputy Vice President of Global Softlines at SGS USA, chair of the Concept 2 Consumer® Interest Group, for her timely assistance.

Developers:

Brooks Tippett, VP of Operations at Pantone

Heidi Carvalho, Textile Technology Consultant at TTACC

Kerry King, Vice President, R&D at Spoonflower Inc.

Mary Brannon, Apparel Technology Coordinator at Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising

Nora Khanna, Product Development Manager at Pantone

Judges:

Carrie Yates, Manager of Product Development at Cotton Incorporated

Marie Cordella, Owner at Cordella Bridal

Rachel Lessne, Owner at Green Envy Eco-Boutique

Sara Engelhard, Product Development Associate at Spoonflower Inc.

Tina Beauvais, President at EmBraced In Comfort

Sponsors:

Pantone

Datacolor

Spoonflower

2014C2C

AATCC received 88 entries from various colleges and universities for its tenth annual design competition. This year’s theme, Boardwalk, had students to showcase their talent in textile design by creating a swimwear collection for 18-30 year olds. Color palettes could be chosen from the PantoneView Colour Planner Summer 2014.whittledsands

See the full competition guidelines.

Awards include first place cash award of US$1,000 along with a copy of Pantone’s Cotton Passport and US$100 Spoonflower gift certificate, a US$750 award for second place and US$100 Spoonflower gift certificate, and two US$100 awards for honorable mentions and US$50 Spoonflower gift certificates.

AATCC would like to extend appreciation to all judges:
Carrie Yates, Manager, Product Development at Cotton Incorporated
Erica Christianson, Nike Swim Designer at Perry Ellis International
Jessica Wright, Print & Pattern Developer at Nike
Julie Lotz, Senior Design Manager at Spanx
Stephanie McCarrey, Designer at Spanx
Tracy Marciano, Senior Swim Designer for Nike at Perry Ellis International

2013C2C

AATCC received 71 entries from 16 colleges and universities for its ninth annual design competition. This year’s theme, Ooh La Leggings!, had students to showcase their talent in textile design by creating coordinating skirt and leggings sets for a 16-24 year old female. Color palettes could be chosen from the PantoneView Colour Planner Summer 2013…Unity & CO.LuckyLondon
See the full competition guidelines.

Awards include first place cash award of US$1,000 along with a copy of Pantone’s Cotton Passport, a US$750 award for second place, and two US$100 awards for honorable mentions.

  • 1st Place – Lucky London by Ashley Meek, Kansas State University
  • 2nd Place – Folklore by Lindsay Ley, University of Wisconsin-Stout
  • Honorable Mentions
    • Friends by So-Young Jung, Central Michigan University
    • Crazy in the 80s by Cheryl Yacenda, Kansas State University

AATCC would like to extend appreciation to all judges:
Amy Cornwell, Technical Designer-Leggings at Kayser-Roth Corporation
Bebe Purcell, Product Development at VF Corporation-Jeanswear
Dan St. Louis, Director at The Manufacturing Solutions Center at CVCC
Emily Coleman, Designer/Merchandise Manager at Jefferies Socks
Heidi Noggle, Technical Designer
Keith Davis, Director of Product Development at Renfro Corporation
Sally Kay, President & CEO at The Hosiery Association

For further information, contact Suzanne Holmes; +1.919.549.3537

AATCC received 34 entries from 13 colleges and universities for its eighth annual design competition. This year’s theme, Birds of a Feather Walk Together, presented students with a real-world design scenario to create original active wear designs for 50-65 year old females for Quilltheir daily walking routine.

The color palette for the collections was to include a combination of 9 colors and students were also asked to incorporate a bird design element in at least one design. See the full competition guidelines.

Prizes include first place cash award of US$1,000 along with a copy of Pantone’s Cotton Planner, www.pantone.com, a US$750 award for second place, and two US$100 awards for honorable mentions.

Winners

1st Place: Quill by Leah Becker, University of Wisconsin-Stout
2nd Place: Minerva by Elizabeth Keebler, Stephens College
Honorable Mention:
Fine Feathers by Carrie Cook, Kansas State University
Madam Mallard by Wynn Farley, University of Wisconsin-Stout

Judges

AATCC would like to extend our appreciation to all judges:

Carlos Vazquez, Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising (FIDM), Instructor, Mentor for the Debut 3rd, Designer
Carrie Yates, Cotton Incorporated, Manager, Product Development
Deborah Young, Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising (FIDM), Assistant Chair, Textile Science
Diana Wyman, Recreational Equipment Inc. (REI), Product Research & Testing Analyst
Kristie Rhodes, Cotton Incorporated, Textile Designer
Rachel Asimakopoulos, Recreational Equipment Inc. (REI), Design Manager, Women’s Sportswear/Women’s Yoga/Children’s Wear

The theme of the 2011 Concept 2 Consumer® (C2C) Design Competition was Eco Chic Bag.

EcoChicBagStudents lent their creative touch to the growing market for reusable shopping bags, creating a marriage of style and sustainability. All colors were inspired by one of the color palettes from the Pantone View Colour Planner Summer 2011 symmetry.

In addition to cash prizes, first and second place winners recieved a copy of Pantone’s Cotton Planner. Each winning entry had one of their bag designs printed and constructed by the Textile Technology Clothing Center ([TC]2).

Winners

1st Place: Surrounded by Abigail Scheer, Rhode Island School of Design
2nd Place: Metamorphosis by Ellen Johnson, University of Wisconsin-Stout
Honorable Mention:
Golden Harvest by Alicia Hinz, University of Wisconsin-Stout
Nature’s Focus by Christina Assuncao, Syracuse University

Judges

Danielle Hazen, Spoonflower Inc., Research Associate
Jeana Fitzgerald, Cotton Incorporated, Manager Product Development
Kerry M. King, Textile Clothing Technology Corporation [TC]2, Manager of Product Development and Sustainability Initiatives
Mary Brannon, Fashion Institute of Design & Merchandising (FIDM), Textile Research Coordinator
Vita Plume, North Carolina State University, Associate Professor, Art & Design

The theme of the 2011 Concept 2 Consumer®(C2C) Design Competition was Summer Bling!.

Students created fabrics or product designs for pool and beachwear based on palettes Blingfrom the Pantone View Colour Planner Summer 2010 magic. Student designers were required to incorporate three-dimensional surface embellishments in their collections. Entries included embellishments anywhere from beading and embroidery to knotting and smocking

In addition to cash prizes, first and second place winners recieved a copy of Pantone’s Cotton Planner.

Fabric Design Winners

1st Place: Shamanism-Spirit of the Summer by Sarah Buck Mueller, Drexel University
2nd Place: Seaside Serenity by Laura Jefferson, University of Wisconsin, Madison

Product Design Winners

1st Place: Hot Hot Hot by Courtney Fitzpatrick, Cornell University
2nd Place: Tide Me Over by Emily B. Parks, Illinois State University

Judges

Carrie McDermitt, CAM, Owner/Designer
Grace Santucci, Springs Creative, Stylist for Craft & Apparel Design
Jeana Fitzgerald, Cotton Incorporated, Manager Product Development
Jeff Bagwell, Target Corporation, Sr. CAD Designer
Kate Sykes, Springs Creative, Digital Stylist for Craft & Apparel Design
Kerry M. King, Textile Clothing Technology Corporation [TC]2, Manager of Product Development and Sustainability Initiatives
Meir Erani, DesignTech Services, President
Nancy B. Powell, North Carolina State University College of Textiles, Associate Professor of Textile Apparel, Technology, and Management
Steve Greenberg, Point Carré, Vice President
Tiffany M. Eubanks, Inspired Digital Solutions, Owner/Designer

The theme of the 2009 design competition sponsored by AATCC’s Concept 2 Consumer® (C2C) interest group and the Computer Integrated Textile Design Association (CITDA) was Color Concepts.

AATCC received 125 entries from 38 institutions around the globe. Competition winners will receive cash awards of US$1,000 for First Place and US$500 for Second Place in each category and complimentary student registration for the 2010 AATCC International Conference. First place winners also received a complimentary copy of Pantone’s Color Passport.

Fabric Design Winners

1st Place: Let Freedom Reign by Miranda Shilati, Syracuse University
2nd Place: Pattern in Architecture by Eleanor Hoffman, North Carolina State University

Product Design Winners

1st Place: Footsteps Maternity by Erika Neumayer, Dominican University
2nd Place: Sweet Snowflakes by Wesley Kathryn Woods, Auburn University

The 2008 design competition, Earth Day, Every Day, was developed by AATCC’s Concept 2 Consumer® (C2C) interest group and the Computer Integrated Textile Design Association (CITDA).

AATCC received 140 entries from 25 institutions worldwide. Final judging took place May 5, 2008 at the AATCC Technical Center, Research Triangle Park, N.C., USA.

The winners were announced at the C2C interest group meeting on May 8. All winning entries will receive cash awards of US$1,000 for first place and US$500 for second place, plus complimentary student registration for the 2009 AATCC International Conference (IC), to be held March 10-12 in Myrtle Beach, S.C., USA.

One of the five finalists in the Apparel Design, Product Design category was also randomly selected for a trip to Bradford, England to participate in the Society of Dyers and Colourists (SDC) Global Design Competition last month. Casey Bianco of Virginia Commonwealth University was selected for that honor.

Interior/Outdoor Design Category, Fabric Design Sub-category Winners

1st Place: Everything Goes Around Comes Around by Hyun M. Koh, Rhode Island School of Design
2nd Place: Wool You Be Mine? by Monica Ogrodowski, Rhode Island School of Design

Apparel Design Category, Fabric Design Sub-category Finalists

1st Place: Green with the Wind by Jessica Murphy, Syracuse University
2nd Place: Iris by Jessica Lee, Virginia Commonwealth University

Apparel Design Category, Product Design Sub-category Finalists

1st Place: Save the African Safari by Allie Thielens, Cornell University
2nd Place: Natural Beauty by Casey Bianco, Virginia Commonwealth University

Judges

Carrie Yates, Cotton Incorporated
Genevieve Garland, North Carolina State University Nonwovens Institute
Jeana Fitzgerald, Cotton Incorporated
Kerry King, [TC]2

In 2006 The American Association of Textile Chemists and Colorists (AATCC) announced its second annual design competition developed by its Concept 2 Consumer® (C2C) Interest Group and the Computer Integrated Textile Design Association (CITDA) in August 2005. Submissions for the C2C/CITDA competition were accepted from both graduate and undergraduate students of institutions with textile design programs and those with art, interior design, and fashion merchandising programs. The aim of the competition is to promote innovative product development. The theme of this year’s competition was “Shades of Comfort,” and the contest was divided into two main categories and two sub-categories:

Print Design – students created a digitally rendered textile print collection
Interior Design-Decorative Pillows or Throws
Apparel Design-Children’s Casual Wear, 2-6x; Spring/Summer Season
Product Design – students created a textile print collection and an actual end product
Interior Design-Decorative Pillows or Throws
Apparel Design-Children’s Casual Wear, 2-6x; Spring/Summer Season

Entries were evaluated on color, texture, appearance, reproducibility, and overall presentation.

Five finalists in each sub-category were asked to submit story boards and final products for judging on May 1, 2006. Winners were announced at AATCC’s C2C Interest Group meeting, held in conjunction with the semi-annual AATCC Committee Meetings on May 3. The winning entries in each sub-category will be awarded US$1,000 for first place and US$500 for second place. Winners will also receive complimentary student registration for the AATCC International Conference & Exhibition, co-located with MEGATEX, at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta, Ga., October 31-November 2, 2006.

Print Design Category, Interior Design Sub-category

1st Place: Pretty-Dirty by Andrea Singer, Philadelphia University
2nd Place: Fireside by Elizabeth Newcomb, North Carolina State University

Print Design Category, Apparel Design Sub-category

1st Place: Best Friends by Carla Rickenbacher, Drexel University
2nd Place: Blooming Jungle by Christine Schmitt, Savannah College of Art and Design

Product Design Category, Interior Design Sub-category

1st Place: Plush Purples by Jessica Roush, North Carolina State University
2nd Place: Fireside by Elizabeth Newcomb, North Carolina State University

Product Design Category, Apparel Design Sub-category

1st Place: Spring and Summer Carousel by Colleen Keller, Cornell University
2nd Place: Bb is for…Butterfly by Cora D. Smith, North Carolina State University

Judges

Mary N. Brannon, Russell Athletics
Dewey Cabe, Target Corporation
Steve Greenberg, Pointcarré USA
Dory Hogan, Private Consultant
Kerry M. King, [TC]2
Kim Munroe, [TC]2
Townson Smith, Valdese Weavers
David M. Williams, Springs Industries

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